Mindset and Science of Personal Transformation > Your Mindset determines your success

Your Mindset determines your success

Instructor(s): Pratap, Dr. Mahendra
Pratap, Dr. Mahendra

Title: CEO

Company: Progia

Website: http://www.progia.com

Mahendra has a distinguished background as a scientist and as an entrepreneur. Mahendra was employed with AT&T and Lucent Technologies for 20 years where he specialized in video communications, personal computer design, ATM and IP networking.

Mahendra has a PhD in Nuclear Physics and has authored over 2 dozen scientific papers.

, Self Paced Open Education Resource
Self Paced Open Education Resource

Title: The Best Teachers in the World

Progia Staff in consultation with the experts in their respective fields have scoured the open education resources to design and organize this course.

Progia salutes the content authors and their respective education institutes. Progia also acknowledges their expertise and generous contributions for making learning more accessible.



Course Description:

What is a mindset? What it has to do with success?

 

Mindsets are beliefs—beliefs about yourself and your most basic qualities. Think about your intelligence, your talents, your personality. Are these qualities simply fixed traits, carved in stone and that’s that? Or are they things you can cultivate throughout your life?

People with a fixed mindset believe that their traits are just givens. They have a certain amount of brains and talent and nothing can change that. If they have a lot, they’re all set, but if they don’t... So people in this mindset worry about their traits and how adequate they are. They have something to prove to themselves and others.

People with a growth mindset, on the other hand, see their qualities as things that can be developed through their dedication and effort. Sure they’re happy if they’re brainy or talented, but that’s just the starting point. They understand that no one has ever accomplished great things—not Mozart, Darwin, or Michael Jordan—without years of passionate practice and learning.

 

Mindset is a simple idea discovered by world-renowned Stanford University psychologist Carol Dweck in decades of research on achievement and success—a simple idea that makes all the difference.

Growth Mindset creates a love of learning and a resilience that is essential for great accomplishment. Virtually all great people have had these qualities.

Course Sessions:
  • Session 1: Your mindset deeply affects your performance
  • Content Author(s): Professor Carol Dweck

    Session Description:

    Carol Dweck, Professor of Psychology at Stanford University takes a closer look at how the brain controls the psyche and how deeply intertwined it is with the field of psychology.

    Students with the 'growth mindset' (i.e. those who believe that they can increase their intelligence through attention, effort and persistence) consistently outperform those with a 'fixed mindset ' (those who believe that their intelligence is fixed).

    Furthermore 'Growth Mindset' itself can be learnt.
     


  • Session 2: Creating a growth mindset
  • Content Author(s): Thoughtful Learning

    Session Description:

    In this blog post, Thoughtful Learning, a group of educators, writers, and designers dedicated to helping students and lifelong learners, presents 5 Steps to Create Growth Mindset in Students

    Here's an easy step by step process to fostering a growth mindset in your classroom:

    1. Believe it. You can’t instill a growth mindset in students until you have it yourself. Start by recognizing your current mindset. It determines the way that you interpret experience.
    2. Teach it. Now that you are shaping your own mindset toward growth, you can teach your students to do so as well. Tell students they can improve their IQs and talents—which are not fixed. Present the evidence you find in this article and in other resources. Teach students that education is not something someone else gives to them. Education is something they must grab for themselves.
    3. Model it. Show students how to recognize judging thoughts, how to stop them, and how to replace them with growth thoughts. Make the rule that judging thoughts spoken aloud in your class will be stopped, and the student will need to rephrase the idea as a growth thought. By doing so with external dialogue, you help students recognize judging thoughts in internal dialogue. You also help students monitor each other and shift their thoughts toward growth.
    4. Nourish it. Mindsets exist within a larger classroom culture. In your classroom, shift the focus from proving to improving, from product to process. An inquiry-based approach to learning facilitates the growth mindset by embracing challenges, obstacles, and criticisms as chief drivers of learning. Failure can be a great teacher if it is approached not as judgment but as opportunity. That mental shift frees you up as well. If you take some missteps as you are trying to shift the classroom culture, don’t be embarrassed. Be empowered to improve.
    5. Assess it. A classroom that focuses on summative assessment fosters an environment for a fixed mindset—assessment is all about judgment. A classroom that focuses on formative assessment fosters an environment for the growth mindset—assessment is about learning. That’s not to say that summative assessments should be eliminated. Rather, when you focus on the formative side, the summative side becomes a rubber stamp that certifies the learning that students have been doing all along.

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